Just arrived: DrinkBot Decanter, Robot Box Shots, Charooba Mug

tikibar_drinkbot_robot_box1

tikibar_drinkbot_robot_box2

tikibar_drinkbot_robot_box3

tikibar_drinkbot_robot_box4

Drinking is fun with the TikiBar TV DrinkBot Decanter, Robot Box Shot Glasses and the Official Charooba Mug. ๐Ÿ™‚

Who wants to review these with me?

Categories
Mostly Everything

Complete Diggnation GoDaddy Promo Codes

revision3_godaddy

Anyone who has bought a domain from GoDaddy will recount such an awful experience with their up-selling strategy. It’s scary: you just don’t know if those extra “but wait, there’s more!” promos went to your checkout cart by accident. Nonetheless, I still use GoDaddy to buy my domains and have the name servers redirected to my Dreamhost account.

If you’re a big fan of Diggnation (or any other show by Revision3 for that matter) you’ve probably entered a promo code to avail of discounts and special promotions to GoDaddy, Netflix, Squarespace, Braintoniq … you get the picture. Here’s a complete list of all the promo codes from Revision3. Apparently everything is on their site, but not everyone knows this!

So next time you buy a domain, use the promo codes above at the checkout cart page to avail of discounts ๐Ÿ™‚

Categories
Mostly Everything

Audible Recommendations: Predictably Irrational, Gaiman’s Graveyard Book, Batman

The alternate title of this post is “The British Pop Culture Invasion.” ๐Ÿ™‚

Ah, to make up for the lack of recommendations for the past few weeks, here are three books I downloaded with my subscription from Audible. The first is a Diggnation recommendation from Kevin Rose titled Predictably Irrational. I got this version as it was cheaper on audio than it was on the shelf (Phoebe bought the tome version), and it’s narrated by this British guy with a strong James Bond accent. Winner.

Why do our headaches persist after taking a one-cent aspirin but disappear when we take a 50-cent aspirin? Why does recalling the 10 Commandments reduce our tendency to lie, even when we couldn’t possibly be caught? Why do we splurge on a lavish meal but cut coupons to save 25 cents on a can of soup? Why do we go back for second helpings at the unlimited buffet, even when our stomachs are already full? And how did we ever start spending $4.15 on a cup of coffee when, just a few years ago, we used to pay less than a dollar?